Resource Constraints

ProcessScheduler provides a set of ready-to-use resource constraints. They allow expressing common rules such as “the resource A is available only from 8 am to 12” etc. There are a set of builtin ready-to-use constraints, listed below.

WorkLoad

The WorkLoad constraint can be used to restrict the number of tasks which are executed during certain time periods.

This constraint applies to one resource, whether it is a single worker or a cumulative worker. It takes the time periods as a python dictionary composed of time intervals (the keys) and an integer number (the capacity). The kind parameter allows to define which kind of restriction applies to the resource: 'exact', 'max' (default value) or 'min'.

c1 = ps.WorkLoad(worker_1, {(0, 6): 2})

In the previous example, the resource worker_1 cannot be scheduled into more than 2 timeslots between instants 0 and 6.

Any number of time intervals can be passed to this class, just extend the timeslots dictionary, e.g.:

c1 = ps.WorkLoad(worker_1, {(0, 6): 2,
                            (19, 21): 6})

The WorkLoad is not necessarily a limitation. Indeed you can specify that the integer number is actually an exact of minimal value to target. For example, if we need the resource worker_1 to be scheduled at least into three time slots between instants 0 and 10, then:

c1 = ps.WorkLoad(worker_1, {(0, 10): 3}, kind='min')

ResourceUnavailable

A ResourceUnavailable applies to a resource and prevent the solver to schedule this resource during certain time periods. This class takes a list of intervals:

worker_1 = ps.Worker('Sylvia')
ca = ps.ResourceUnavailable(worker_1, [(1,2), (6,8)])

The ca instance constraints the resource to be unavailable for 1 period between 1 and 2 instants, and for 2 periods between instants 6 and 8.

Note

This constraint is a special case for the WorkLoad where the number_of_time_slots is set to 0.

DistinctWorkers

A AllDifferentWorkers constraint applies to two SelectWorkers instances, used to assign alternative resources to a task. It constraints the solver to select different workers for each SelectWorkers. For instance:

s1 = ps.SelectWorkers([worker_1, worker_2])
s2 = ps.SelectWorkers([worker_1, worker_2])

could lead the solver to select worker_1 in both cases. Adding the following line:

cs = ps.DistinctWorkers(s1, s2)

let the solver selects the worker_1 for s1 and worker_2 for s2 or the opposite, worker_2 for s1 and worker_1 for s2. The cases where worker_1 is selected by both s1 and s2 or worker_2 by selected by both s1 and s2 are impossible.

SameWorkers

A AllSameWorkers constraint applies to two SelectWorkers instances. It constraints the solver to ensure both different SelectWorkers instances select the same worker. For example:

s1 = ps.SelectWorkers([worker_1, worker_2])
s2 = ps.SelectWorkers([worker_1, worker_2])

could lead the solver to select worker_1 for s1 and worker_2 for s2. Adding the following line:

cs = ps.SameWorkers(s1, s2)

ensures either worker_1 is selected by both s1 and s2, or worker_2 is selected by both s1 and s2.